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Rodent Club Below are the 40 most recent journal entries recorded in the "Rodent Club" journal:

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September 25th, 2018
11:34 am
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How To Trust Train Your Rats... With These 4 Methods
https://www.ratcentral.com/trust-training/

How To Trust Train Your Rats... With These 4 Methods



Trust training rats isn't an easy task... Since all rats are different and grow comfortable with you at their own pace there's no one perfect technique.

However there’s usually a variation of techniques you can use to get your rats comfortable with you if one technique doesn’t work!

That being said one thing that you shouldn’t ever do is give up on your rats. The process of trust training can be frustrating, especially if something isn’t working. But in this post we’re going to give you a few ideas to try to make sure that you take your trust training techniques to the next level.
How To Trust Train Your Rats:

Below we're going to give you a few different techniques that we've used with success to gain our rats trust.

There may be a few things you need for specific techniques, however there are some techniques which involve no cost at all.

Keep in mind that buying your rats a few extra treats or accessories will be a good investment, not just for trust training, but generally as well.​

Trust training rats effectively is as simple as good planning, remember that if you fail to prepare, prepare to fail.
Frequently Asked Questions:

We've been asked a few questions about trust training before and these are the common questions that we get asked. Hopefully this will help answer any worries you have.
How Long Does Trust Training Take?
Will My Rat Bite Me?
Should I 'Train' Them Everyday?
The Food Giver Technique:
Difficulty
Cost
Time

The 'food giver technique' is a simple training method that most rat owners will use and is most likely to give you a chance of success.

The basis of this technique is letting your rats come to you for treats. This is a vulnerable situation for a rat, so once your rats are happy to take treats from your hand inside their cage it's usually the right time to start picking them up and taking them out of the cage.

This technique of trust training can be slow progress, but it's one of the easiest methods of gaining trust with your rats over time.

As with all techniques, this doesn't work with all rats so it's a good technique to try initially and then potentially adjust your approach if it doesn't work

Here's how to follow this technique!
Step 1: Let Them Settle
Step 2: Treat Training
Step 3: Holding
Step 4: Field Trips
The Bonding Technique:
Difficulty
Cost
Time

The idea behind the bonding technique is to confine your rat in a 'safe' space outside of their cage, then through spending more time around you they will learn that you aren't a threat.

This technique can be a little difficult, especially for nervous rats, but it's one of the most rewarding as a rat owner. It also takes a fair amount of time, as you will need to do this more than once a day, every day until they're trust trained.

If this technique doesn't work out so well, it's a good idea to try one of the other techniques that have a better success rate.

Here's how to follow this technique!
Step 1: Bonding Setup
Step 2: Positive Reinforcement
Step 3: Introducing Hands
Step 4: Field Trips
The Neutral Space Technique:
Difficulty
Cost
Time

The Neutral Space Technique involves allowing your rats to free roam in a safe area they can't escape from, while you yourself are present in the area.

The difficulty for you will lie in not interacting with your rats too much in the early stages, as you want them to come to you once they are ready.

This technique can be wonderful for quickly integrating rats that are a little bit braver by nature, or for continuing trust training after a little success with another technique.

Here's how to follow this technique!
Step 1: Let Them Settle
Step 2: The Neutral Zone
Step 3: Staying Neutral
Step 4: Holding
The Familiarity or 'Scent' Technique:
Difficulty
Cost
Time

The Familiarity or Scent technique for trust training is one that's worked well for us with difficult, nervous cases.

The idea is to simply introduce your nervous rat to you by introducing your scent before introducing yourself.

Nervous rats can find even your presence as imposing and scary, so it's a good idea to gently introduce them to you, and yes this takes more time but there are many rats out there that never get trust trained since more common methods can fail to work.

Here's how to follow this technique!
Step 1: Introduce Your Scent
Step 2: Introducing Hands
Step 3: Treat Giving
Step 4: Petting
Step 5: Selecting Next Technique
Conclusion:

Trust training your rats isn’t the easiest part about being a rat owner, or the most enjoyable… It is a necessary process we must all go through though and we should never give up on training our rats since they’re sociable creatures and will in time come to love and adore your company.

The techniques described above are the few that we personally use and have done so with success. If you use any other techniques or methods please let us know in the comments as we always love to hear what others are doing with their rats.

We hope you enjoyed the post and as always if you have any questions let us know below and we’ll get back to you.
September 24th, 2018
05:50 pm
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More creeps that use dogs and tractors to hunt down small rodents for the twisted fun of it! >:-/
I'd like to see these sick creeps get run over by their own tractor! People like this are a complete waste of oxygen on the planet!!! >:-/















02:06 pm
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Another cruel scumbag who hunts wild rodents with his pet minks!
People like this jerk make me sick! I seriously wish cancer upon creeps like this who think that it is okay to sick their larger pets against small animals in the wild! >:-/









September 14th, 2018
03:02 pm
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This is good news at least Three companies stop animal testing =^.^=
https://www.peta.org/blog/nh-foods-ensuiko-sugar-ban-animal-tests/

Global Food Companies Ban Animal Tests After Discussions With PETA
Written by Zachary Toliver | September 5, 2018

Update: After discussions with PETA, another food company has decided to end cruel and deadly tests on animals! Fuji Oil Holdings Inc.—a leading producer of oils, fats, confectionery ingredients, and soy—has confirmed that it will no longer fund, conduct, or commission tests on animals in order to make health claims about its products. In previous experiments funded and conducted by the company, rats and mice were starved, force-fed, and injected with and exposed to harmful chemicals. Then their necks were broken, and they were dissected.

Originally posted on August 27, 2018:

Japan’s largest meat supplier and its third-oldest sugar producer are the latest companies that PETA has persuaded to establish new policies banning cruel and deadly experiments on animals.



© iStock.com/tiripero

After discussions with PETA, multibillion-dollar global meat manufacturer NH Foods and multimillion-dollar sugar company Ensuiko Sugar Refining Co. have both agreed to stop conducting and funding animal experiments used to make dubious health claims about their products.

In 2016, NH Foods funded and published an experiment that was conducted on 20 mice. Experimenters fed the animals a collagen metabolite (made from chickens’ feet), took their blood, and killed and dissected them. The company currently has an animal-testing contract through 2020, but it has confirmed with PETA that once that contract ends, it’ll no longer conduct or fund experiments on animals unless required to do so by law.

In 2015, Ensuiko Sugar published an experiment that it conducted using 112 mice. Experimenters fed the mice a common sweetener, injected them with a flu virus through their noses, drained their blood, and killed and dissected them. At our request, the company confirmed that it won’t conduct or fund animal tests unless they’re legally required and posted the new policy on its website.
These major companies did right by animals by ditching unjustifiably violent experiments on them.

Like any other person, human or otherwise, these mice valued their lives. Up until the moment they were force-fed, drained of their blood, and killed, these individuals experienced unimaginable terror and would have done their best to escape torment and an untimely death. Vivisectors reduce complex individuals to laboratory equipment and take away their most fundamental right to life—in expensive and time-consuming experiments that when compared to a free and easy coin flip are five times worse at predicting the effectiveness of human clinical therapies.



These two companies join Asahi Group Holdings, Barilla, The Coca-Cola Company, Ezaki Glico, General Mills, House Foods, ITO EN, James White Drinks, Kewpie Corporation, Kikkoman, Lipton, Meiji Holdings, Nissin Foods Holdings Co., Ltd., Ocean Spray, PepsiCo, POM Wonderful, Riken Vitamin, Sapporo Holdings, Satake Corporation, Suntory Holdings, Ltd., T. Hasegawa Co., Toyo Suisan Kaisha, Ltd., Welch’s, and Yakult Honsha, which have all ended experiments on animals for making health marketing claims after talking with PETA, sparing countless animals’ lives.
Speak Out Against Cruel, Wasteful Animal Tests
02:31 pm
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The University of Delaware needs 2 stop cruel experiments on rats now & jail the bitch who did them!
The University of Delaware needs 2 stop cruel experiments on rats now & jail the bitch who did them!

People like this woman who does experiments on poor harmless animals at the University of Delaware in my opinion deserve to be drowned in a shark tank, but that isn't legal, so the horrible monster of a bitch should be locked up in jail!!!

https://support.peta.org/page/4767/action/1


Drugs, Near Drowning, and Electric Shocks in 'Child Abuse' Experiments



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The University of Delaware's Tania Roth claims that she studies child abuse. But her experiments are all about making vulnerable and sensitive rats suffer. She's forced alcohol down the throats of newborn ones. She's stuffed pregnant mothers into tiny restraint tubes and blasted them with strobe lights. She's purposely terrified rats by repeatedly shocking their feet, and she's taken newborns away from their mothers and given them to other rats who are unable to care for them.

To deal with the problem of neglectful and horrible human parents, Roth has been abusing nonconsenting rats at taxpayers' expense for nearly two decades. What is there to show for it? Published papers with glaring omissions about the treatment of Roth's victims, no apparent benefits for human children who are abused, and a mountain of nonhuman children' bodies.



newborn rats and mother
Sensitive adult rats and pups imprisoned in Roth's lab were destined to be tormented in her experiments.

Attacking the Most Vulnerable

Since 2000, Roth has been subjecting rats to mistreatment in early life in order to study their genetic and behavioral changes. In other words, she makes baby animals depressed, anxious, and fearful. Among her cruel and sordid methods to distress newborns are these:

Injecting infant rats with opioids
Frightening baby rats by exposing them to the odor of fox urine so that they believe they're in danger
Artificially increasing the level of the stress hormone corticosterone in rats to make them even more afraid when exposed to the odor of fox urine
Electrically shocking infant rats

In a recent study, Roth terrified pregnant rats to see if it affected their babies. Three times a day, for three weeks, these animals were squeezed into PVC tubes only 2.5 inches wide and then exposed to high-frequency strobe lights and bombarded with white noise.



rat inside lab device
The image above, taken from an article on rodent handling and restraint techniques written by University of Notre Dame staff, depicts a restraint tube similar to the ones used by Roth in her experiment.

These animals were tormented both day and night. Roth then removed the pups from their mothers at birth and put them with other rats.

In another experiment, Roth placed pups with adult rats whose own babies had been taken away from them and purposely deprived the foster moms of sufficient nesting materials. The mothers were so stressed that they dropped, dragged, ignored, and stepped on their foster pups.

In yet another experiment, she stuffed rats into plastic, wedge-shaped cones so small that they were unable to move. She then placed them inside a Plexiglas enclosure, smeared cat food on top of it, and placed that enclosure inside a tiny metal cage with an adult cat for one hour. This was so that the rats would experience "direct cat gustatory activity."



rat in wedgecone
This image, taken from an article on rodent handling and restraint techniques written by University of Notre Dame staff, shows a restraint cone similar to the ones used by Roth in her experiment.




This image depicts an experiment similar to one that Roth conducted, in which a cat was enticed to lick food off an enclosure containing terrified rats.



Roth has also subjected rats to a "forced swim" test, in which the animals are placed in beakers of water and experimenters measure how long they struggle to stay afloat.

forced swim device
© FST.jpg | TaoPan | CC BY-SA 3.0

These experiments are riddled with mistakes.

A Trail of Little Bodies in Roth's Wake

Roth also routinely kills newborn pups whom she deems "excess," treating these babies like disposable lab equipment—to her, their lives seem to have no value. She describes killing some by injecting formalin (liquid formaldehyde) directly into their hearts—a killing method that is not approved by the American Veterinary Medical Association because it's considered inhumane.

Rats are excluded from the Animal Welfare Act—the only federal law with legally enforceable animal-welfare standards—so they aren't even afforded the meager protections it offers. What's more, Delaware exempts laboratory experiments from cruelty-to-animals prosecution. So Roth gets away with tormenting these social, intelligent beings by doing things that would warrant criminal charges if they were committed outside a laboratory.

We're demanding that the University of Delaware put an end to these tests, and we're calling on the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to stop funding Roth's experiments.

Please speak out!

You're welcome to use our template letter, but remember that putting your subject line and message into your own words will help draw attention to your e-mail.
September 9th, 2018
09:32 pm
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Woman Does The Nicest Thing To Help An Elderly Rat Enjoy Life Again
https://www.thedodo.com/close-to-home/woman-creates-mobility-sling-elderly-rat

Woman Does The Nicest Thing To Help An Elderly Rat Enjoy Life Again

"She absolutely loves it."



By Stephen Messenger
Published On 09/07/2018

If there's one thing this dear old rat knows, it's how much her owner loves her.

Zodi is 2 and a half years old, putting her well into her golden years for her species. Though she still has the playful spirit of a much younger rat, Zodi has developed a condition called hind leg degeneration (HLD) — making it difficult for her to run around and explore like she used to.

Fortunately, the rat’s owner, Samantha Loran Martin, found the perfect way to help Zodi enjoy life to its fullest.



Samantha Loran Martin

"I noticed that when I held the back end of her body up so she didn't need to support it herself, she would try to move around so much faster than when she has her limited mobility hindering her," Martin told The Dodo.

With that in mind, Martin got creative.

"I came up with the idea to make her this sling-like contraption so that I can walk around with her, holding her back end up, to let her move around and explore a little faster," she said.



Here's video of Zodi in action:



Thanks to the simple sling — crafted from a sock and a long piece of fabric — Zodi is able to experience the world closer to the way she had in her younger days.

That's a priceless gift provided by the person who thinks the world of her.

"I thought it would be a fun and interesting experience for her, and I was right," Martin said. "She absolutely loves it, and actually gets excited when she sees it."

Zodi is a lucky rat to have such a thoughtful and caring friend.
August 28th, 2018
01:07 pm
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Rat Teeth Problems, Trimming and Care Tips
https://www.thesprucepets.com/rat-teeth-1238497


Rat Teeth Problems, Trimming and Care Tips

By Adrienne Kruzer, RVT

Updated 04/23/18



Pet rat teeth can be downright problematic. Not all exotic pets have problems with their teeth but pet rats can. Rats have some teeth that grow continuously throughout their lives, and these teeth may periodically require tooth trims if they are not naturally worn down, are damaged, or if your rat has a tooth alignment issue.
Monophyodont Teeth

Dogs and cats are born with no teeth, develop deciduous teeth, and then lose those baby teeth so that their adult teeth can take their place. Rats, on the other hand, only have one set of teeth their entire lives. Their monophyodontal mouths start showing teeth at as young as eight days of age. These teeth, twelve molars, and four incisors remain in your pet rat's mouth for the rest of its life. The molars never grow, but the incisors continuously grow, sometimes causing problems for your rat.

The incisors of a rat are naturally colored yellow and are harder than a human's teeth. Their upper incisors should be about four mm long and their bottom incisors almost twice that length at seven mm long. Much of the incisors are hidden underneath your rat's lips therefore in order to get a good look at their teeth you'll need to gently pull back their cheeks and lips to make sure the teeth aren't curling up and back into your rat's mouth or into the side of their cheek.
Overgrown Teeth

The incisors, or front teeth, are easy to identify when they become overgrown. They will usually grow so long that they begin to curve and stick out between the lips where they can become stuck on things, or worse yet, grow into the gums or roof of your rat's mouth. The molars, or teeth in the back of the mouth, do not grow so; therefore, they are not a problem like they can be in guinea pigs and rabbits.

Most rats will wear their incisors down appropriately when they gnaw on their food, but some rats are born with misaligned teeth, jaws, or suffer trauma at some point in their lives which inhibits normal gnawing action.
Incisor Tooth Trims

If done correctly, tooth trims are not painful. There are two common methods used to trim incisors. The first is by using regular dog nail clippers to cut the tooth like you would a toenail. This method is not the preferred way to trim teeth. There is a high risk of cracking or splitting the tooth because of the force needed to use the clippers. This method can cause pain if the tooth is split up to the nerve or is trimmed too short.

The second method is by using a handheld rotary tool, like the Dremel, with a cut-off wheel to slice the excess tooth off. This method does require a bit more skill and anesthesia or sedation for rats since their mouths are so small but can be easily performed by a trained exotics veterinarian (​find one near you) or veterinary technician. By using a rotary tool, no trauma will occur to the tooth or nerve when cut. The only concerns are for trauma to the gums or lips if the wheel accidentally grazes them, or if the tooth is trimmed too short. This is why it is necessary to anesthetize rats to properly, and safely, trim their teeth.

Owners of rats and other exotic pets with teeth that continuously grow must be aware of the possible complications regarding their pet's teeth. Without the proper attention, overgrown teeth can cause serious trauma, anorexia, infections, pain, and even death from the inability to chew and swallow. Thankfully the problem of overgrown teeth is easily controlled with regular tooth trims and monitoring of tooth length.
01:03 pm
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Rat Eyes: Health, Infection, Blindness
http://understandingpetfancyrats.com/2015/08/24/rat-eyes-health-infection-blindness/


Rat Eyes: Health, Infection, Blindness


At some point or another, it is likely that an owner is going to be dealing with an eye problem from his or her rats’ eyes. Rat eyes are very sensitive, and must be watched over to ensure nothing bad happens to them. While rats do not have perfect sight, they still rely on vision as another sense.



What Does a Normal, Healthy Rat Eye Look Like?



healthy rat eyesNormally, a rat’s eye will be clear of discharge. It will not be puffy or swollen, and it will be nice, bright, and rounded. They look like little beads, frog eggs, or chia seeds. Maybe even like tiny marbles. There should be no cuts, dents, or scrapes; and there should not be a cloudy lens. A cloudy lens in the eyeball means that something is a muck, whether it be an eye infection or a cataract in the rat eyes. The eye should be shiny, rather than dull. Dull eyes might signal dryness.
Do Dumbo Rats Have Different Eyes from Standards?

Dumbo rats have a few body shape and size differences due to their genetic mutations, and one of those differences is the eyes. Dumbo rat’s eyes are going to be set a bit further apart. They also have eyes that seem to point downward, rather than pointing upward, resting on top of the skull. They still have the same eyesight, and do not suffer from any additional problems due to the setting and placement of the eyes.




How Do I Know If My Rat Has an Infected Eye?



If a rat has an infected eye, it could start off as a barely noticeable symptom. The symptoms might start off as dryness, redness, watering of the eyes, or puffiness. A dry eye is characterized by a dull appearance, rather than shiny and wet. Puffiness and redness will be characterized by an inflamed, red eyelid and eye lining. Generally, you will notice a discharge or watery eyes with this symptom. Discharges could vary, but may be red tinted with Porphyrin. In the worst cases, the eye might appear swollen, bulging, or clouded. These are very serious issues that could deem a rat blind if it does not receive veterinary attention.

As an overview, here are the symptoms of infection again:

Inflammation of the eyelid
Redness
Watering
Swelling of the eyeball
Itching
Porphyrin discharge
Pus discharge
Cloudy eye

Treating a Pet Rat Eye Infection



There is only one avenue available if an infection begins in a rat’s eye: antibiotics. A pet rat eye infection is caused by bacteria that have bred within the eye, causing inflammation, toxin deposits, pus, and potentially blindness. It is usually the result of a cut to the eye or another contagious animal that has passed on the infection.
Can My Rat Injure Its Own Eye?

A rat can most definitely injure its own eye. Occasionally, rats may hurt themselves while scratching or playing. They can actually scratch the surface of their eyeball, or they can cause deeper damage to it. It’s fairly unlikely for this to happen, but there is the possibility of infection when this happens. The rat will need a round of antibiotics if any irritation persists for longer than a day or two to protect the rat’s eye sight and keep him or her from becoming blind or losing the eye.
What Happens If Something Is Stuck In the Eye of the Rat?



If the rat gets something stuck within its eye, it will need to be removed immediately by a veterinarian. Usually if something gets stuck in the eye it’s due to wooden bedding; for example, a splinter of wood forcing its way into the eye. The longer it is in the eye, the more damage the object can cause. The rat could go into a panic from the pain and discomfort and potentially lose the eye. Self removal isn’t advised, but if the rat is panicking and the situation is dire (and the object can be pulled STRAIGHT out, as is the case with a splinter), tweezers can be used in case of emergency. I do NOT recommend this; but for those who are an hour away from the closest rat vet with a screaming, frightened, panicking animal who is actively fighting with the splinter, it might be the only immediate option. The animal must then be rushed to a vet to evaluate the injury and antibiotics and pain medication must be obtained.

Will My Rat Go Blind, or Is It Already Blind?



Rats are not by nature blind. Just like humans, they can occasionally be born blind due to various reasons, they can lose their sight due to malnutrition or abuse, and they can lose vision due to eye injuries. They do not have the best vision, but they are definitely not blind.

As for injuries, it is possible that a rat can lose their vision. Eye injuries usually are not very serious and tend to be minor scratches on the outermost layers of the eye. For those that go deeper and affect the lens, pupil, or other sections of the eye, vision loss is a very big possibility. Antibiotics and other preventative measures such as cones could help to save the rat’s vision.
Sleeping rat has its eyes closed. Sometimes, rats will sleep with their eyes open; but it isn't very common. Photo Credit: Starsandspirals via Flickr
Sleeping rat has its eyes closed. Sometimes, rats will sleep with their eyes open; but it isn’t very common. Photo Credit: Starsandspirals via Flickr
Can a Rat Sleep with Its Eyes Open?

Sometimes, a rat may have its eyes open while sleeping. I will tell you right now that it is probably one of the creepiest, scariest, most worrying things that you will probably ever see out of your pet rats. When they sleep with their eyes open, it is enough to give any owner a heart attack; especially if they’re sleeping in an odd position. They may open and close their eyes as they sleep, appearing as if they are keeping one eye open to watch their surroundings. As cool as that would be, the rat is either fully awake and looking at you or the eye just happens to be open while the rat is sleeping. They do not watch you while they sleep, though.

12:55 pm
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Common Health Problems Of Pet Rats
https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/common-health-problems-of-pet-rats.html

Common Health Problems Of Pet Rats



Rats are generally hardy animals, and plenty of them live long and happy lives without ever suffering from any major health issues or needing veterinary treatment. However, it's worth noting that there are a variety of potential health problems and illnesses that your pet rat may fall prey to, so it's important to be on the look out for the early warning signs of sickness and act accordingly. Some of the most commonly observed health problems in pet rats are detailed below.
General indicators of ill health

Your pet rats will generally be more active at night than during the day, and you should get used to their behaviour patterns in order to identify out of character behaviour. If one of your rats consistently does not take part in the usual group rough and tumble, shows defensive aggression to the other rats, or is generally lethargic, this is cause for concern. Similarly, if the rat is not eating, disinterested in treats and not alert or interested in interacting with you, you should pay attention. Your rat's coat should be smooth and sleek, and changes in the condition of the coat can be an early indicator of the onset of illness. A 'starey' coat (where the hair appears to be standing on end, or is disturbed and not smooth to the touch) should always be considered indicative of a potential problem.
Wheezing, sneezing and breathing noisily

Any problems with your rat's breathing can be an indication of respiratory distress, which left untreated, can lead to permanent damage of the respiratory tract. The majority of pet rats carry an organism called mycoplasma, which dwells in their respiratory systems. While the organism is dormant and not harmful in most cases, some rats are prone to infection from mycoplasma, which usually manifests in juvenile rats as prolonged periods of sneezing caused by bacterial infection. This can lead to potential complications and secondary infections such as bronchitis, lung abscesses and pneumonia, so early treatment is vital. Generally speaking, occasional sneezing in rats is not necessarily cause for alarm, unless it is recurrent or prolonged. Rats can fall prone to irritation, colds and dust inhalation just like people, so while sneezing should always be monitored and never ignored, is not necessarily indicative of a serious problem as a standalone symptom.
Red discharge from the eyes or nose

Your rat's eyes should always be bright, alert and free from discharge. The nose should be clean and not runny. Seeing a red discharge from your rat's eyes or nose can be very alarming, but do not panic- this is not blood. The mucus membranes of rats contains a pigment known as 'porphyrin,' and while seeing porphyrin discharge around the eyes or mouth can be a sign of illness, it also manifests in situations of stress. See if you can pin it down to any environmental factors within your control before seeking veterinary advice. If the rat is showing any other signs of sickness or the discharge continues for longer than three days, seek veterinary advice.

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Skin problems

Parasites such as mites which manifest in rats can lead to problems such as extreme pruritus (itchiness) which can lead to lesions and scabs on the skin from constant scratching. The usual treatment for mites in rats and other pets is a veterinary prescribed pesticide such as Ivermectin. A skin scraping and microscopic examination of the skin slide may be necessary to confirm diagnosis of mites prior to treatment. Scabs on the skin can also be caused by a dietary problem or food allergy in your rat, so it is important to find the root cause of the problem by removing any potential allergens from the diet, such as foods containing colouring agents, artificial additives, or nuts.
Tumours

As they age, some rats will develop tumours. Female rats are more prone to this than males. Overweight rats, and those fed on a diet high in fat are most at risk. The tumours are often benign, and start off as a small lump under the skin that steadily grows. They most commonly occur around the area of the groin or armpit. Unless they become sore, impede movement or ulcerate, they are often best left alone in aging rats, although surgical intervention is sometimes indicated.
Obesity

Overweight rats live shorter lives than their fit companions, and are more likely to suffer from associated health problems. Your rat's diet should not be too high in fat, and your rat should be fit and active, and fed a diet appropriate to its age and activity levels. Rats are notorious for enjoying sweet treats and foods that are bad for them- a bit like people in that respect! So it's up to you as their owner to monitor their diet and make sure that they're eating appropriately and not receiving too many treats, or the wrong kind of snacks.
Hot weather

Rats control their temperature through their tails and the soles of their paws. When the weather heats up, it's important to protect your rats from heat stroke or heat exhaustion. Make sure there is sufficient air circulation in their cage, perhaps placing a fan in the room with them. You might also want to consider adding a couple of ice cubes to their water, and even providing a shallow 'paddling pool' in the cage which they can use to cool off. Rats also enjoy frozen treats like peas and other frozen vegetables, and there's no reason why they can't enjoy the summer just as much as you can!

This list is intended as a guide to some of the common problems and symptoms to watch out for in your pet rats. It is not intended to be exhaustive, or to be used in place of a professional veterinary diagnosis. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment will give your rats the best chance of a full recovery in the event of any disease or illness. Check your rats over every time you handle them for any indication of ill health or illness, and seek veterinary advice if you have ay concerns.
August 27th, 2018
11:27 am
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What You Can and Cannot Feed Your Pet Rat
https://pethelpful.com/rodents/Rat-Nutritional-Information-Can-my-Pet-Rat-Eat-This


A List of Safe and Dangerous Foods for Your Pet Rat
Ealisa Adams more

Learn which foods safe for your rat to eat and which are not.
Source
What You Can and Cannot Feed Your Pet Rat



Knowing what your rat can and cannot have is important. Of course, pet stores and most large store chains carry rat food, which is fine for feeding your rat. However, sometimes you may want to give your rat a snack or feed him or her what you’re feeding your family that night. In that case, it is important to research to make sure that the food is safe for your rat.

When I cook, I try to conserve food that I would have thrown away for the rats. Potato peals are a good example. I keep a bag in the freezer, and when I peel potatoes while cooking, I will place the peels in the freezer and occasionally treat my furry friends to a snack. Frozen veggies are great for rats on hot days. They love it when I place the veggies in some water so they can play with their food before they eat it.

When you first feed your rat a new food, you will probably notice them take a small bite, then ignore the food. Many owner think they are done and will take the food away. However, what the rat is doing is testing it. Rats do not have a gag reflex, so if they eat too much of something that will make them sick, it could kill them. By testing their food, the rat is trying only a little to see if it makes him or her sick. If it doesn’t, your pet will go back and finish off the food.

However, I’ve noticed that after a while, rats will begin to trust their owners and eat all of the food without testing it more and more frequently. It is important to realize this as an owner so that you are careful to not feed your rat something that may make him sick.

It is also important to remember that your rats are strong. If you leave food laying around while your rats are out, you can expect it to be dragged off before long. Rats are strong enough to move large pieces of pizza, hot dogs, and even tacos or bean burritos.

Below are lists of the foods that are okay for your rat, the foods that are not, and the foods you should be careful with. If you don’t see a food you are looking for, try doing a little online research. Always check around before you feed your rat a new kind of food. You never know whether or not the food could be poisonous or toxic to your furry friend.
Safe Foods

Here are foods your pet rat can safely eat.


Apples. Cut the apple up and make sure to remove all the seeds. Seeds are hazardous for rats.
Applesauce. Feed them very little if the applesauce has lots of sugar or other fattening ingredients.
Apricots.
Avocados. These are very fatty for rats and should be given in moderation.
Bananas. My rats love it when I smash the bananas up like pudding and add nuts or other fruits.
Beef. Chicken is healthier for your rat, but beef is okay if the fat is kept to a minimum.
Blackberries.
Blueberries. Be careful when feeding these to your rats because they can be messy!
Blueberry buckle baby food.
Boysenberries.
Bread. While my rats love bread and haven’t had any problems, I’ve read some articles about rats choking on bread. I would recommend feeding only very small pieces to your rats and toasting it first. You may even soften the bread by dipping it in milk or water.
Broccoli.
Butternut squash. Make sure that the squash is thoroughly cooked before feeding it to your rat.
Cantaloupe.
Carrots.
Cashews.
Cauliflower.
Celery. This vegetable is fine for rats, but it doesn't have very much nutritional value.
Cheese. Small amounts are okay for rats. Soy-based cheese is healthier for them.

Safe foods for rats include grapes, carrots, and cucumbers.


Cherries.
Chicken. This is the healthiest meat for your rat.
Chicken bones. Surprisingly, these are not only healthy for rats but also good chew toys. Next time you have chicken for dinner, save the bones.
Choy.
Cold cuts.
Cooked sweet potatoes.
Corn. Corn is good for your rats whether it is on the cob, from the can, or even frozen.
Cottage cheese.
Cranberries.
Cream cheese on crackers.
Cucumber.
Dog food. People who make their own rat food will often add dog food to the mix. However, you don’t want to skimp on quality, and you want to get a low-protein type of food.
Dried bananas. These are great for rats because they are high in potassium.
Dried cranberries. If your rat is prone to urinary tract infections, this is great to add to its diet. Cranberries are good for keeping the urinary tract clean and healthy.
Dry cereal. Cheerios are great for feeding your rat. However, be careful about feeding your it cereal that contains a large amount of sugar. Puffed rice cereals are yummy for rats, but avoid rice krispies and other sugary choices.
Dry rolled oats. Any type of oats is fine as long as it does not contain any sugar.
Fruit baby food.
Grapes. Purple grapes are believed to prevent cancer in rats.
Green beans. Cooked green beans are very nutritious.
Green peppers. Just make sure they aren’t too spicy for your rats and try to feed them in small amounts at a time.

Lettuce is also good for your rat, as long as it's not iceberg.


Ham.
Hard boiled eggs. These should not be fed to your rat on a regular basis, just as a treat once in a while. I’ve heard that these are good for pregnant rats because of the fat and extra protein.
Honeydew melons.
Kale.
Kiwi.
Lettuce. Romaine lettuce is the best for your rat because it has more nutritional value than iceberg. Some people will tell you to avoid iceberg lettuce altogether because it has close to no nutritional value.
Macaroni and cheese.
Mashed potatoes.
Mealworm.
Meat baby food.
Melons.
Mushrooms. These are only okay for your rat if they are cooked and should be fed in moderation.
Oatmeal.
Oatmeal cookies.
Papaya.
Parsley.
Pasta. Rats can have cooked or dried pasta. They find tri-colored spirals that have a spinach or tomato flavor extra tasty. Dried pasta is good because it is crunchy and they like to chew on it. Pasta has a great source of carbohydrates, which are good for rats.
Peaches. Make sure to remove the pit from peaches because it can be harmful.
Pears.
Peas.
Plums.
Pomegranates.
Popcorn. It should be unsalted and unbuttered if possible.
Popsicles. These are great for rats on hot summer days. However, try to only feed your rats non-fat and sugar-free popsicles.
Potatoes.
Pumpkins. Pumpkins are fine for rats to eat. However, the seeds are high in fat and should be fed to your pet in moderation.

Feel free to feed your rat strawberries, scrambled eggs, and rice.


Raspberries.
Red peppers. Test the pepper first to make sure it isn’t too spicy. Then feed only small amounts of it to your rat at a time.
Rice. Brown rice is especially good for your rat.
Saltine crackers. My rats love these as snacks. I keep a small sack of them by my chair and feed them crackers when they want a snack. I try not to overdo it though because the crackers are high in salt and I’m not sure if too much would make them sick.
Scrambled eggs. The protein is great for rats, especially pregnant rats.
Small dog treats. Small treats are ideal because rats should only have treats in small portions. You can always cut up larger treats into smaller ones—you may even need to do the same with small treats.
Soy products. Soy nuts are good for rats, but make sure they are roasted and unsalted. Soy products are high in protein and have cancer-preventing agents. Other good soy products include soy milk, soy yogurt, soy tofu, and soy crumbles.
Squash. Cooked squash is best.
Strawberries. Rats love strawberries. They are not only sweet and yummy but also healthy for them.
Sunflower seeds. Make sure that the seeds are unsalted. You can buy these cheaply in bulk and add some to your rat's cage every once in a while for a healthy snack.
Turkey. Chicken is the better meat for your rat, but small amounts of turkeys are fine too.
Vanilla custard baby food.
Vegetable baby food.
Walnuts. Make sure to only feed your rat these in moderation. They make a great treat every once in a while.
Watermelon.
Whole grain crackers. Add a little topping to the crackers for a wonderful little snack.
Whole wheat pasta.
Whole wheat bread.
Yellow peppers. Peppers are fine for your rats as long as they aren’t too spicy, so you may want to test it first.
Yogurt. Probiotic yogurt in small amounts is good for the gut flora.
Yogurt covered pretzels.
Yogurt drops. Most rats absolutely love these.

Dangerous Foods

Foods that are dangerous for your rat


Apple seeds. Apple seeds have a small amount of cyanide in them that can be harmful for rats.
Avocado skin.
Beat tops. These can cause urinary tract problems and stones in the kidneys and bladder due to their extremely high levels of oxalates.
Blue cheese. The mold that is used to make blue cheese is toxic to rats.
Carbonated drinks. Rats can’t burp, which is why they should never drink carbonated drinks.
Caffeinated drinks. Drinks containing high amounts of sugar are bad for your rats.
Candy. Like chocolate, candy is too sugary. Rats can have problems with digesting these foods.
Chocolate. This is also bad for rats because of the high fat and sugar content. I’ve heard that some owners feed dark chocolate to their rats once in a great while without problems. However, I just avoid chocolate altogether.
Dried corn. While fresh corn is okay, dried corn is not. This is because it contains fungal contaminates that can lead to liver cancer in rats.
Green bananas. While regular bananas are okay, green bananas inhibit starch digestion enzymes.
Green potato skins and eyes. These contain solanine, a toxin for rats.
Hamster food. Hamster food is high in fat.

Foots that are bad for rats include candy, carbonated drinks, chocolate, and blue cheese.

Licorice. This food is suspected to cause neurological poisoning in rats.
Mango. This fruit contains d-limonene and can cause kidney cancer in male rats.
Moldy foods. Some people think that just because rats are rats, they can eat moldy food. However, mold and bacteria can be extremely toxic to rats, just as they can be to humans.
Oranges. Both the outer and the white parts of orange peels can be harmful for male rats. I’ve heard that it seems okay for females, but I would just avoid citrus fruits like oranges to be on the safe side.
Orange juice. Orange juice contains d-limonene, which can cause kidney cancer in male rats.
Peanuts. These have been found to have anti-nutrients that, like raw dried beans, will destroy vitamin A and certain enzymes that rats need to break down proteins and starches. This will then cause red blood cells to clump together.
Poppy seeds. While it is unknown why, poppy seeds seem to cause rats to become sick and sometimes even die.
Potato eyes.

Surprisingly, a number of vegetables are bad for rats, including sweet potatoes, potato eyes, raw onions, oranges, and spinach.


Raw artichokes. This vegetable inhibits protein digestion in rats.
Raw beans. Destroys vitamin A and enzymes that rats need to digest protein and starches. This can cause red blood cells to clump and is a hazard for rats.
Raw Brussels sprouts. These can destroy thiamin.
Raw bulk tofu. The bulk unpackaged tofu contains bacteria and is unsafe.
Raw onions. These can cause anemia and give rats upset stomachs.
Raw red cabbage. Raw red cabbage destroys thiamin.
Rhubarb. Rhubarb contains toxic amounts of oxalates.
Raw sweet potato. Since sweet potatoes are potatoes, people think they are okay to feed to their rats. However, raw sweet potatoes recently have been found to have compounds that will form cyanide in rat's stomachs.
Spinach. Due to the high levels of oxalates, spinach can cause urinary tract problems and stones in the bladder and kidneys.
Sweet feed. This is feed made for horses and is not good for rats because there is too much corn and molasses in it.
Wild insects. These should never be fed to your rat because they can carry diseases and internal parasites. I’ve heard that cooked insects and insects bought from a store is okay.

Foods to Be Cautious With

Peanut butter and other thick, sticky foods. These should be given in very small amounts because they can cause choking. I will mix the peanut butter with a little bit of jelly or water to help it become less sticky and less of a choking hazard.
August 25th, 2018
08:19 pm
[moxxey]
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How Rats Communicate, And How To Interpret It
https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/how-rats-communicate-and-how-to-interpret-it.html

How Rats Communicate, And How To Interpret It



Every single species of animal has their own unique methods of communication in terms of their body language, vocalisations, behaviours and interactions. Additionally, many animals have also evolved to communicate with people in a slightly different way than they do with members of their own species, in order to bridge the gap between our understanding and interpretation of each other’s actions!

This is true for even the smallest of caged pets, like the popular Fancy Rat-and rats are of course very lively, intelligent and loving little animals that are both highly social with other rats and also, that often bond strongly with their human handlers.

In order to keep your pet rats happy and meet their needs, it is important to develop a basic understanding of how rats communicate with each other and with people, and how to interpret this.

In this article, we will look at the various different tools that rats use to communicate, including their body language, vocalisations and behaviours, and how to understand what their different actions mean. Read on to learn more.
Body language

Rats may be small, but they are very expressive, and you can tell a lot about your rat’s mood and temper by learning to interpret their body language.

The rat’s tail is one of the first things to look at, as rats have almost as comprehensive a language of tail flicks and swishes as dogs! Rats may swish their tails from side to side if they are excited, but this same behaviour can also appear in an aggressive rat, if accompanied by a tense, stiff posture.

A rat that is stressed, anxious or frightened may flick their tail from side to side through a large arc of movement, indicating that something about the situation that they are in is upsetting them.

Rats use their front limbs to pull things that they want towards them-such as a treat, or your finger if they want attention-and by the same token, they push things away that they do not like! If you are offering your rat a treat and they push it back towards you, they are letting you know that it is not up to scratch!

A rat that is sitting with its back hunched, head up and paws held up may be feeling either defensive or aggressive, so handle with care, or give them a time-out. This is often accompanied by bristling fur-however, bristled fur can indicate fear, sickness or cold, so always take into account environmental conditions too, and whether your rat may be unwell.

Rats that are interested in something will hold their head up and sniff the air, trying to get more information, and they will also generally hold their ears forwards and perhaps stand up on their back legs to get a better look! A rat that is focusing hard on something or that is confused about what they are seeing and trying to get more information may also move their head from to side to side, which helps to adjust both the depth perception of their eyesight, and garner additional scent information too.
Vocalisations

We tend to think of rodents like rats and mice as being quite noisy animals when talking to each other or interacting with people, but in fact, we as humans do not even have a high enough range of hearing to make out most of the sounds that a rat can make! If you have a cat or a dog as well as your rats and your other pet suddenly leaps up and looks towards the cage for no apparent reason, they have probably overheard a rat conversation that is above your range of hearing!

The range of sounds that we can hear, on the other hand, are almost all related to frustration or distress, or as part of play-related mimicry. If your rats are playing together and one rat seems to be squeaking a lot, they may be being bullied, or protesting after another rat has taken their toy or food!

Longer squeaks and shrieks are almost exclusively used to indicate fear or distress, and this is something that you should always pay attention to.

Another sound that rats can make is known as “bruxing,” and this is the sound your rat makes when they grind their teeth together. This is a common rodent behaviour, and you may see your rat grinding their teeth even if you cannot actually hear it unless you are very close to them. Whilst grinding our teeth is a sign of frustration or annoyance in humans, in rats it is usually a very happy and relaxed sound, indicating that your rat is feeling good and enjoying whatever is going on at that time!

Bruxing is also important for rats to grind down their ever-growing teeth, so if you notice your rat doing it all the time, they may need to have their teeth checked out by the vet to make sure there is nothing wrong.
08:16 pm
[moxxey]
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Reasons Why Rats Sometimes Bite
https://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/reasons-why-rats-sometimes-bite.html

Reasons Why Rats Sometimes Bite



If someone has never handled a rat before one of the first questions they ask is; “will it bite me?” There is a general misconception that rat’s bite a lot, while this may be true with wild rats, pet rats rarely bite if handled correctly.

Pet rats have been bred over time to be passive towards humans. This does not mean they will never bite, but there will usually be a reason or warning signs beforehand. So understanding your rat is very important, over time you will get to know it better and understand what it does and doesn’t like.

If you rat does bite you, it will probably be due to one of the following reasons:
Fear

Probably the most common reason a rat will bite a human is because they are scared or in fear. If a rat has previously been traumatised or mistreated when being handled then you will need to handle them with caution. It can take a long time for a rat to become trusting again, if you are taking on an adult rat take extra care when first handling it.

Rats that have not been handled or socialised much can also show signs of fear. When you pick them up they may try and run away, become difficult to hold still or make a squeaking noise. You will need to handle them for short periods of time to build up trust, if you force the matter they may bite out of fear.

Generally rats will still not bite without giving you a warning, they are not aggressive rodents and will look for another way out first, like running or hiding. If they feel trapped or cornered they will bite as a last resort.
Pain

Like most animals or rodents, a rat is capable of biting out if it experiences some sudden pain. Accidents can happen when handling or playing with rats, if you trap their tail in the cage, accidentally drop them, or do anything else to hurt them they can bite as a defence mechanism.

If you rat suddenly bites you and behaves completely out of character it can be a sign that the rat is in pain. You should consult a veterinarian if you think there might be an underlining health issue.
Elevated Hormones

While developing into adult rats, bucks can experience elevated hormone levels for periods up to around one year old. There is a social hierarchy within a group of rats living together; occasionally bucks will show aggression towards each other while trying to establish themselves as the alpha rat.

Ultimately you are in charge overall and rats will become submissive to this fact, but as they mature sometimes they will challenge you too. This aggression can be directed towards you in the way of a rat charging at you, or sometimes biting you.

When rats are acting aggressive because of hormones they will not show fear. Instead of cowering away from you, they will charge at you. You will need to address this behaviour as it’s important that you reinforce the fact that you are in charge.

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Pregnancy

If a rat is pregnant or has recently given birth then there is a risk of being bitten. Female rats become very territorial and defensive over their young, it is best not to disturb them or their nest during this period.
Redirected Aggression

If you interject yourself between two rats fighting you can be the victim of a bite from redirected aggression. If you get bitten while sticking your hand or fingers in-between rats fighting it’s not at fault from the rat. While in the heat of the moment rats will bite out at anything they see as a threat, don’t take it personally it will be forgotten when everything has calmed down.

If you need to separate fighting rats, wrap a thick cloth around your hand first or spray some water on them from a distance. Don’t feel bad for breaking them apart, you’re doing the right thing. And if you did get bitten, don’t blame your rat they were only reacting to the situation.
Biting through Cage Bars

It’s advisable that you never poke your fingers through the cage bars as rats may have a nibble on them. This behaviour is more common with rats that have been fed by their owners passing food through the bars. If you do get bitten then it will be an accident, rats immediately associate anything poking through the bars as food.

It is important to note that this is not a sign of aggression, you should not treat your rat as if it poses a danger to you. Just remember to not stick your fingers through the bars, and more so make this clear to any children in the household.
Being Surprised

Never surprise your rat, they won’t appreciate it and may bite out at you. If you are approaching their cage and they are sleeping or motionless start talking to them, make them aware you are approaching. Certainly never wake a rat up by just picking them up suddenly, there is a good chance they will feel threatened and bite whatever is touching them.

Pay attention to this rule too when a rat is happily resting in its bed/nesting area. It may not anticipate that you are going to handle it, or even want to be moved if it is comfortable. When cleaning out the cage you should position the rats away from their nesting areas, clean out and replace the old bedding with new. Slowly reintroduce your rat to their new clean bedding to minimise their surprise to the new clean surroundings.
In Summary

When treated correctly, rats are passive, forgiving and friendly animals and make for great safe pets. But it is important to remember that they do have sharp teeth, if you cross any of the boundaries outlined above you will put yourself at risk of being bitten. But, if you take time to get to know your rats, understand their behaviour and respect their boundaries, you needn’t ever worry about being bitten.
August 19th, 2018
09:00 pm
[moxxey]
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This 92McNeil is a sick bastard letting their dogs and ferrets sick and kill trapped rats and birds!
This 92McNeil is a sick bastard letting their dogs and ferrets sick and kill trapped rats and birds! This person needs to get hit by a large truck and runover! I hope they suffer for the way they use their pets to hurt small animals!!!

08:23 pm
[moxxey]
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How to Keep a Pet Rat Clean
https://www.wikihow.com/Keep-a-Pet-Rat-Clean

How to Keep a Pet Rat Clean

Three Parts:Giving Your Rat a BathMassaging a Hairless RatKeeping Your Rat’s Home CleanCommunity Q&A

Pet rats, in general, are fairly clean and are very good at cleaning themselves. However, just like humans, some rats are better at cleaning themselves than others. And older or injured rats will definitely need more help.[1] Keeping your rat’s home and environment clean will also go a long way to ensuring your rat stays clean.
Part 1
Giving Your Rat a Bath

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1
Fill the sink with an inch of warm water. The water temperature should be a comfortable warm temperature similar to what you would want in a bath — not too hot and not too cold. Since rats are fairly small, you only need to fill the sink with about an inch of water for the bath.[2]
Make sure the water stays warm throughout the bath. If the water starts to cool off too quickly, add some more warm water to the bath.

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2
Place your rat inside the water and allow them to get comfortable. Just like other animals, some rats like baths and some do not. When you place your rat into the bath you’ll want to keep a good hold on them unless they love the water and are not trying to get out.[3]
Some rats may not like the loud sound of running water, but may calm down once you turn off the tap.

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3
Pour water over your rat’s body and fur. Once your rat is comfortable in the water, hold them firmly with one hand to keep them steady. Use your other hand to scoop up the water and run it over your rat’s back, neck and belly.[4]
Avoid getting any water directly in their ears or eyes.

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4
Shampoo your rat’s fur. Once your rat is sufficiently wet, squirt a small amount of shampoo on your rat's back. Use your free hand to scrub the shampoo across your rat’s back and belly. Use your nails to gently scrub the shampoo into their fur and remove any stains.[5]
You will want to use very gentle and natural shampoo on your rat.
Shampoos designed for kittens and puppies will work as long as they do not contain any flea medications or other additional chemicals.
One great option for shampoo is a gentle and natural baby shampoo, as it will have very limited ingredients in it.
Another great option for shampoo is pure castile (vegetable-based) soap.

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5
Wipe your rat’s face with your fingers. In order to avoid getting water and soap in your rat’s eyes and ears, use the tips of your fingers to wipe water around their face gently. This will help clean their nose and mouth.[6]

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6
Clean your rat’s tail. Use your fingers to gently wipe your rat’s tail from base to tip. Go in the direction of the scales, not against them. Don’t scrub the tail, just wipe.[7]
Because your rat is always dragging its tail behind it, the tail can get dirty before the rest of your rat. If your rat doesn’t need a complete bath, you can just use a damp cloth to clean the tail.[8]

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7
Replace the dirty bath water with clean, warm water. Once you’re finished shampooing your rat, empty the dirty water from the sink. Refill the sink with clean, warm water — the same temperature as before.[9]

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8
Rinse your rat off thoroughly in the clean water. Use the clean bath water to completely rinse all shampoo from your rat’s fur and skin. As an alternative, you can rinse off your rat using running water instead of refilling the sink — if your rat is comfortable with the loud noise.[10]

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9
Dry off your rat in a clean towel. Wrap a clean towel completely around your rat. Gently massage your rat all over to remove any excess water and start the fur drying.[11]
You won’t need to get your rat completely dry before placing it back in its cage. Once your rat is fairly dry, it will finish the process on its own.
If your rat isn’t scared of the noise, you can also use a blow dryer on a low heat setting to dry your rat.[12]
You might also consider brushing your rat’s fur while it is drying, if they enjoy the extra attention.

Part 2
Massaging a Hairless Rat

Image titled Keep a Pet Rat Clean Step 10
1
Fill the sink with an inch of warm water. Put the stopper in your sink and fill it with comfortably warm water. You only need about an inch of water in the sink.[13]

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2
Squirt pure castile soap onto a washcloth and soak in the sink. Squirt a small amount of pure castile soap, of any fragrance, on a washcloth. Soak that washcloth in the warm water until it’s completely wet, then wring it out.[14]

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3
Massage your hairless rat. Unfold the washcloth and place it on your rat like a blanket. Hold your rat steady with one hand and use your other hand to gently massage your rat all over. Your hand should be on top of the washcloth while you massage your rat.[15]
Adjust the location of the washcloth to ensure you get your rat’s belly and legs.

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4
Rinse the washcloth and your rat. Rinse all the pure castile soap off the washcloth under warm water. Wring out the washcloth once it’s rinsed. Use the same process to massage your rat a second time with the rinsed washcloth.[16]

Part 3
Keeping Your Rat’s Home Clean

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1
Wipe your rat’s cage on a daily basis. One of the worst smells a rat can generate is from urine that’s been left sitting somewhere too long (e.g. a blanket, bottom of the cage, etc.). In order to ensure this smell doesn’t start, wipe the surfaces of your rat’s cage on a daily basis (e.g. bars, floors, ramps, etc.).[17]
This daily cleaning can easily be done with baby wipes or even a damp cloth. Nothing fancy or in-depth is required.

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2
Check your rat’s fabric items regularly. Most rat cages will contain several fabric-based items, like blankets and hammocks, for your rat to rest and relax. Inspect and smell your rat’s fabric items on a daily basis (or every two days) to make sure they still smell fresh. If they smell bad, or are starting to smell bad, replace them with clean items.[18]

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3
Replace your rat’s litter and bedding every day. Depending on how you have your rat’s cage setup, you may have both bedding (for the bottom of the cage) and litter (for the actual litter box). Spot clean soiled litter every day, and scoop out and replace bedding that's been soiled with urine and pellets. Daily cleaning will help reduce and eliminate bad odors.[19]
Depending on the type of litter and bedding you use, you can either sweep it out of the cage with a small broom and dust pan, or you can use a vacuum.
Once the old bedding and litter have been removed from the cage, you should wipe the cage floor and litter box before putting in new litter and bedding.

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4
Clean the area around your rat’s cage regularly. Chances are your rat isn’t going to always keep their dirty litter and bedding and poop inside the cage. Therefore it is a good idea to wipe the areas around the outside of your rat’s cage regularly to remove stains and smells.[20]
One tip for cleaning the area around the outside of the cage is to use a mixture of water and vinegar and a clean cloth.
Don’t forget to clean the outside surfaces of the cage, the floor under the cage, and the walls around the cage.

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5
Disassemble and clean your rat’s cage on a monthly basis. At least once a month, completely take apart your rat’s cage and clean every square inch of it carefully. You may find it easier to do this monthly cleaning in your bathtub or laundry sink.[21]
This type of cleaning requires slightly more heavy duty cleaner, like diluted bleach. But if you use bleach, make sure the cage pieces are completely rinsed before putting your rat back inside.

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6
Soak non-fabric items in a bucket of diluted bleach monthly. While you have your rat’s cage in pieces to clean it, take any smaller plastic or metal pieces and soak them in a bucket of diluted bleach. This might include shelves or toys.[22]
Remember to completely rinse and dry these items off before putting them back in the cage.

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7
Wash fabric items as required in the washing machine. Chances are you will have more than one of each fabric item you use (e.g. hammock, blanket, etc.) so you can replace these items and put the dirty ones aside until you have enough for a laundry load. Once you have a load, you can wash the items with pure castile soap, or with a gentle/mild laundry detergent.[23]
It probably doesn’t matter if you use the dryer or hang the items to air dry, just don’t use fabric softener or dryer sheets.
08:13 pm
[moxxey]
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This bad pet shop in Arizona is depriving it's rodents of adequate food, water and clean housing!
This bad pet shop in Arizona is depriving it's rodents of adequate food, water and clean housing! After hearing about this awful pet shop neglecting it's rats and mice because they are just "feeders" I had to do a write up about it! Someone managed to rescue a few of the little darlings but the evil bastard of a manager refused to let them buy more! >:-/ Any reputable pet shop would sell frozen rodents and not encourage the cruel act of live feeding!!!


August 13th, 2018
12:28 pm
[moxxey]
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Dirty Chinese Restaurant was too lenient! How about Sickeningly Cruel Chinese Restaurant!!!
This article makes my blood boil! I hope these bastards die slowly in a fire for what they do to small animals! At the very least they should be locked up in tiny jail cells to never see the sunshine again!!!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3362448/Shocking-footage-reveals-rodents-boiled-alive-stripped-fur-turned-Chinese-RAT-KEBABS.html

Shocking footage reveals how rodents are boiled alive and stripped of their fur... to be turned into Chinese RAT KEBABS

The cruel video shows rats being boiled alive and then stripped of their fur
It shows the horrific process undertaken to prepare the rats for eating
Workers are first seen dunking the rats into a bucket of steaming hot water
They are then thrown onto the ground to be stripped of their fur by hand

By Corey Charlton for MailOnline

Published: 08:35 EDT, 16 December 2015 | Updated: 08:44 EDT, 16 December 2015

This shocking video shows rats being boiled alive and stripped of their fur by restaurant workers preparing them for food markets.

The creatures can be heard squealing during the cruel ordeal, while the workers, oblivious to the animals' pain, simply continue chatting and laughing.

Filmed in China, where people regularly eat rats as a snack or part of a wider meal, the footage has been viewed thousands of times since it was posted online.

The live rat is pulled from a cage by its tail before being submerged in a bucket of boiling hot water (pictured)




Others in the video - supposedly filmed in the back room of a restaurant in China - are seen pulling fur off of the boiled rats

The one minute-long video shows one man is tasked with pulling the live rats out of a cage. Holding a rat by the tail, he is filmed dunking it into a bucket water and swishing it around the steaming hot liquid.

Despite the creature's squeals, he then throws it onto the kitchen floor where it continues wriggling for several seconds.
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On the ground next to it lie six other dead rats and clumps of hair, while several people are seen furiously using their hands to strip other rats of their fur.

China's record on animal rights remains one of the worst in the world and the country is regularly the targeted by campaigners and political protesters.

Many farming techniques Europe is trying to eliminate, such as battery cages, are commonplace across the country.

For example, only in October - as it faced mounting pressure from campaign groups - did Tesco announce it would stop selling live turtles in its China stores.

The creatures, considered a delicacy across many parts of the country, were often packed alive and suffocated inside plastic bags or butchered in front of customers.

The retailer had been selling the live turtles since 2007, however the company said it stopped the trade because it was ‘not in line with our approach on animal welfare’.

Two UK-based groups Viva and One World Wildlife has been furiously campaigning for Tesco to stop the trade, which sourced the animals from farms in Dalian, in the country's north east.


A rat thrown onto the ground after being boiled alive is seen lying next to other creatures that have been stripped of their fur
August 10th, 2018
08:46 am
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How to keep your pet rats cool in the hot Summer weather!
http://aboutpetrats.com/summer-heat-cooling-off-pet-rats.html




Home » Care » Beat the Heat & Keep It Cool: Summertime Tips for Pet Rat Care

Beat the Heat & Keep It Cool: Summertime Tips for Pet Rat Care
Posted on July 1, 2016 by About Pet Rats in Care, Health, Safety


Protecting your rats from becoming overheated is a matter of life and death. Rats don't have sweat gland. Any excessive heat is dissipated through their tails. Some believe that longer tailed rats were born in hotter months since they needed more tail-surface to release the extra heat. In the wild, rats are nocturnal. They're more used to cooler weather rather than the full sun and heat.

How to tell if your pet rat is hot:

Excessive heat is released through the skin of pet rats’ tails

Besides simply feeling your rat’s body temperature, you’ll discover your rat has turned into a “pancake” if it’s too hot. By “pancake” I mean they literally flatten themselves out. Very similar to cats and dogs, your rat will stretch out and lie as elongated as possible on top of surfaces rather than inside any boxes, hanging beds or other hideouts. When hot, their tail will also be hot to the touch.

Pet rats should be kept in a room no warmer than 80°, preferably cooler. If you’re not sure of the temperature, place a thermometer in the room. Always keep your rats’ cage away from direct sunlight. Even in colder months, sunshine can heat up the cage making it uncomfortable.



How to keep your rats cool when the weather gets hot:

Close windows, drapes and blinds during the day
Freeze water in plastic water bottles or even plastic gallon jugs. These can be placed in the cage so that your rat can choose whether or not to lie next to or on top of the icy containers. When doing this, have two sets of plastic containers so that you always have a set of completely frozen ones in the freezer. This way you can easily replace the containers in the cage that have gotten so warm the water is no longer frozen.
Offer your rats cooling treats such as frozen peas, watermelon and cantaloupe. A fun game is “pea diving” which combines a frozen treat with water: Fill a glass casserole dish with about an inch of water. Place peas in the water and let your rats begin diving for peas.
Sprinkle your pet rats with water
Use a fan to keep the air circulating. However, your rats will only be cooled by the fan if they’ve been sprinkled with water. (Otherwise the fan will just be blowing warm air on them.)
If, the room temperature is over 80 degrees and/or if your rats appear uncomfortable, they need to be moved to a cooler spot. Smaller cages can be placed on the floor of the coolest room in your house. Oftentimes this will be a bathroom. If their cage is too big to move, use a small cat carrier to place them in the coolest possible place in your home or apartment.
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It’s too hot for Henderson to sleep inside his pirate ship. Instead, he’s decided to take a nap on deck.

If you aren’t able to control the temperature of the room in which your rats are housed when the weather gets hot, take them over to stay in a friend’s house that’s air conditioned.
Above all, never ever leave your rats inside a locked car in the summer. Despite parking in the shade, high temperatures will still increase quickly inside a car. This is true even if you’ve cracked the windows. If you need to take your rats with you, use a “stealth bag” and take them in with you rather than leaving them in the car. (For information on an ideal “stealth bag”, see On the Road with Rats.)



Signs of heatstroke:

Drooling
Open-mouthed breathing
Lethargy, weakness, reluctance to move, limp body

What to do in the event your rat experiences heatstroke:

Remove your rat from the hot area immediately, handling him or her as gently as possible. Begin cooling your rat by sprinkling water over his or her fur. You can also rub water onto your rat’s ears, hands and feet and tail.

Cooling off your rat must be done GRADUALLY to prevent further complications. If cooled off too quickly or if cooled too much, life-threatening conditions can result. Place your rat on a wet towel inside the carrier you use to take your rat to the vet.
cantaloupe

Cooling fruits (such as canteloupe) and frozen peas help alleviate the heat—as long as your rats are comfortably housed in a room 80° or, preferably, less.

Phone your vet to let them know you’re on your way and that your rat may have suffered from heat stroke. The reason it’s good to call first is 1) it gives your veterinarian a head’s up and 2) the technicians time to get all of the needed supplies and equipment ready.

Once you walk in the door, a veterinary technician, assistant or receptionist will have been alerted and will immediately take your rat to the treatment area. Usually fluids and possibly oxygen will be administered. Your veterinarian will want to keep your rat under observation for at least an hour in case further signs of damage appear and to make sure your rat recovers as fully as possible. Internal organs can be damaged and some symptoms may not appear right away. Once you bring your rat home, you’ll want to monitor closely and report any changes and concerns to your vet immediately.



Hopefully you'll avoid having your pet rats overheat by following the tips above for keeping your pet rat cool when the weather gets hot.
August 9th, 2018
02:34 pm
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How to Introduce a New Pet Rat
https://pethelpful.com/rodents/Introducing-a-New-Pet-Rat


PetHelpful»Rodents»Rats

How to Introduce a New Pet Rat
Updated on May 23, 2018
Dreamhowl profile image
Jessica Marello more

Dreamhowl has worked in pet retail for over ten years. She has owned betta fish, dogs, fancy mice, fancy rats, hamsters, and more.


Learn the step-by-step introductory process along with tips and personal insight. | Source

Note that not all rats (whether male or female) will accept a cage mate. If a slow introduction does not improve their relationship or aggression, do not force it. Aggressive rats can cause serious harm if they view another rat as a threat.

Rats make great pocket-sized pets for people of all ages. Rats are social animals and thrive with companions in pairs or groups. This is easy when buying or adopting rats from the same litter that have already bonded. But creating friendships between new rats is not always simple. Rat owners sometimes need to introduce a new rat to an existing rat or group of rats. By following a step-by-step process, rats can be introduced safely and without injury.



We introduced Patches to a new rat so she wouldn't be lonely - rats love companions! | Source
1. Quarantine the new rat

You should keep the newly acquired rat in quarantine for one to two weeks to avoid the transfer of disease. Quarantine means keeping the new rat in its own cage in a separate room without contact with other rats. This means washing your hands after handling the new rat before handling other rats. You also should not swap out items from the new rat's cage with anything from the resident rat’s cage. Illness can spread through this sort of contact. If you have many rats, this could result in unexpected and undesired vet bills. Some signs of illness to watch out for include:

lack of energy
not eating or drinking
discharge around nose or eyes
noisy breathing
excess sneezing
excess scratching

During this time, you can still interact with your new rat, but keep an eye on their health. Is your newcomer’s nose wet, or crusted with red discharge? Rat noses are naturally dry, and wetness can be a sign of illness. Rats have sensitive respiratory systems and are prone to respiratory illness. An excess of red mucus around the nose and eyes may be a sign of stress, especially after moving to a new environment. But, red discharge can also signal illness if constantly present. Do not confuse the red mucus with blood, but keep an eye on it all the same.



We put Gadget - the newcomer - in a temporary cage while she bonded with Patches. | Source
2. Place the cages side by side

After quarantine, the next step is placing its cage side-by-side with the resident rat cage. The cages should be far enough apart that the rats cannot reach each other. This allows the rats to smell and see each other, becoming accustomed to each other. Sense of smell is a big deal to rats, and is much stronger than their eyesight. Rats have different personal scents, like any other animal. Female rats often “scent-mark” the cage, especially if another rat has urinated there. Sometimes rats will mark you because you smell like another rat!

Did you know that you can help introduce your rats by letting them run around in the other's cage? Letting each rat explore the other's smell helps familiarize the scent and helps them become friends!
How many rats do you have?

I don't have any yet!
I just have one so far
I have two adorable ratties!
I have three or more, a rat colony!

See results

The rat cages should spend at least one week next to each other, every hour of every day. The rats need to become used to each other’s scents so the newcomer smells less like an impostor and more familiar. The rats should be curious about each other, sniffing and looking at each other. If one of your rats is showing aggressive behavior or hissing, proceed with caution. The rat may have an aggression toward other rats, and may be less likely to accept another cage mate.
3. Introduce them in neutral territory

A few days after placing their cages together, you can have a play date between your resident and new rats. The first introduction should take place in neutral territory to avoid territorial behavior. Neutral territory is a place where your resident rat or rats do not usually play. A common compromise is the bathtub, but can also be the bed, the couch, or anywhere that the rats do not hang out. The bathtub was the best neutral ground for us, and should be harder for the rats to escape from. When having a first play date, have something soft (like a towel) along the bottom of the tub. Place plenty of tempting treats in the middle for the rats to share. Rats love treats, and eating them together is a great way for them to bond!


There is a method on YouTube called The Glove Rat that helps when introducing new rats. It's great for when one or both rats seem jumpy, nervous or aggressive toward the other. In the video, a woman follows the rats around with a gloved hand while keeping close watch on their behavior. The goal is to deflect negative confrontation between the two rats, such as biting. If you get the sense that the rats are going to get into a fight, you place your gloved hand between them and break it up. The glove is there for your own protection, and makes the process feel less nerve-wracking.
See the Glove Rat in Action!



30

PetHelpful»Rodents»Rats

How to Introduce a New Pet Rat
Updated on May 23, 2018
Dreamhowl profile image
Jessica Marello more

Dreamhowl has worked in pet retail for over ten years. She has owned betta fish, dogs, fancy mice, fancy rats, hamsters, and more.
Contact Author
Learn the step-by-step introductory process along with tips and personal insight.
Learn the step-by-step introductory process along with tips and personal insight. | Source

Note that not all rats (whether male or female) will accept a cage mate. If a slow introduction does not improve their relationship or aggression, do not force it. Aggressive rats can cause serious harm if they view another rat as a threat.

Rats make great pocket-sized pets for people of all ages. Rats are social animals and thrive with companions in pairs or groups. This is easy when buying or adopting rats from the same litter that have already bonded. But creating friendships between new rats is not always simple. Rat owners sometimes need to introduce a new rat to an existing rat or group of rats. By following a step-by-step process, rats can be introduced safely and without injury.
Click thumbnail to view full-size
It's important to introduce resident rats to new rats before housing them together.We introduced Patches to a new rat so she wouldn't be lonely - rats love companions!
We introduced Patches to a new rat so she wouldn't be lonely - rats love companions!
We introduced Patches to a new rat so she wouldn't be lonely - rats love companions! | Source
1. Quarantine the new rat

You should keep the newly acquired rat in quarantine for one to two weeks to avoid the transfer of disease. Quarantine means keeping the new rat in its own cage in a separate room without contact with other rats. This means washing your hands after handling the new rat before handling other rats. You also should not swap out items from the new rat's cage with anything from the resident rat’s cage. Illness can spread through this sort of contact. If you have many rats, this could result in unexpected and undesired vet bills. Some signs of illness to watch out for include:

lack of energy
not eating or drinking
discharge around nose or eyes
noisy breathing
excess sneezing
excess scratching

During this time, you can still interact with your new rat, but keep an eye on their health. Is your newcomer’s nose wet, or crusted with red discharge? Rat noses are naturally dry, and wetness can be a sign of illness. Rats have sensitive respiratory systems and are prone to respiratory illness. An excess of red mucus around the nose and eyes may be a sign of stress, especially after moving to a new environment. But, red discharge can also signal illness if constantly present. Do not confuse the red mucus with blood, but keep an eye on it all the same.
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Make sure your cage is large enough for both your resident and new rats!We put Gadget - the newcomer - in a temporary cage while she bonded with Patches.
We put Gadget - the newcomer - in a temporary cage while she bonded with Patches.
We put Gadget - the newcomer - in a temporary cage while she bonded with Patches. | Source
2. Place the cages side by side

After quarantine, the next step is placing its cage side-by-side with the resident rat cage. The cages should be far enough apart that the rats cannot reach each other. This allows the rats to smell and see each other, becoming accustomed to each other. Sense of smell is a big deal to rats, and is much stronger than their eyesight. Rats have different personal scents, like any other animal. Female rats often “scent-mark” the cage, especially if another rat has urinated there. Sometimes rats will mark you because you smell like another rat!

Did you know that you can help introduce your rats by letting them run around in the other's cage? Letting each rat explore the other's smell helps familiarize the scent and helps them become friends!
How many rats do you have?

I don't have any yet!
I just have one so far
I have two adorable ratties!
I have three or more, a rat colony!

See results

The rat cages should spend at least one week next to each other, every hour of every day. The rats need to become used to each other’s scents so the newcomer smells less like an impostor and more familiar. The rats should be curious about each other, sniffing and looking at each other. If one of your rats is showing aggressive behavior or hissing, proceed with caution. The rat may have an aggression toward other rats, and may be less likely to accept another cage mate.
3. Introduce them in neutral territory

A few days after placing their cages together, you can have a play date between your resident and new rats. The first introduction should take place in neutral territory to avoid territorial behavior. Neutral territory is a place where your resident rat or rats do not usually play. A common compromise is the bathtub, but can also be the bed, the couch, or anywhere that the rats do not hang out. The bathtub was the best neutral ground for us, and should be harder for the rats to escape from. When having a first play date, have something soft (like a towel) along the bottom of the tub. Place plenty of tempting treats in the middle for the rats to share. Rats love treats, and eating them together is a great way for them to bond!


There is a method on YouTube called The Glove Rat that helps when introducing new rats. It's great for when one or both rats seem jumpy, nervous or aggressive toward the other. In the video, a woman follows the rats around with a gloved hand while keeping close watch on their behavior. The goal is to deflect negative confrontation between the two rats, such as biting. If you get the sense that the rats are going to get into a fight, you place your gloved hand between them and break it up. The glove is there for your own protection, and makes the process feel less nerve-wracking.
See the Glove Rat in Action!

It is normal for rats to express dominance by pinning, grooming, or or chasing each other around. The submissive rat will let out little “eeps” that sound like whispers, and mean that they "give up. Understand that this is normal rat behavior. Dominance is a big deal in rat colonies, and even rats sharing a cage will have scuffles over dominance. Watch out if a rat squeaks very loud or “screams” in pain, or if the rats are taking fighting to a level you don’t like. Some signs of rat aggression include:

pulling a rat's hair out
biting and drawing blood
swinging it's tail around
hissing at other rats

Watch the play date and follow your gut. If you think one of the rats is taking it too far, separate them. And the first few play dates should be short. Fifteen minutes is enough for the first few days, and you can introduce them as many times as you prefer each day. As the days pass, the rats should know each other more and be less nervous. If you have an aggressive rat on your hands, give them some space before you try again.



The bed has become a place of familiar territory and playtime for my two rats. | Source
4. Introduce them in familiar territory

Once your rats are making progress, you can introduce them in familiar territory. Familiar territory is a place where the resident rat likes to play on occasion. This is different because your resident rats will feel territorial about their location. This place can be the bed, the sofa, or anywhere your resident rat might consider their own. The interactions between the rats here can be more tense than in neutral territory. Having keen eyes and using a gloved hand are very important in familiar territory. Your resident rat may feel the need to guard their territory, and more dominance fights may occur. Watch that neither rat is aggressive toward the other. If behavior escalates to a violent level (or if you feel the need to separate them), end the session. You can always give it another try later.

If play dates in the resident rat’s territory aren't going well, have the sessions on neutral ground again. You can repeat this until you feel that the rats can move up to familiar territory. Do this as many times as you deem necessary. Depending on your rats and their personalities, this step can be simple or take several tries.



My males fight for dominance, but they also snuggle together afterward. | Source
Need a new rat cage?
Kaytee My First Home Multi-Level Habitat for Exotics, 30.5” x 18” x 30”
Kaytee My First Home Multi-Level Habitat for Exotics, 30.5” x 18” x 30”

Multi-level cages give rats room to play and live comfortably. I use the same style of rat cage (store brand) for my fur babies. And for the price, this cage is a steal!

5. House your rats in the same cage

When your rats have bonded enough to share a cage, you can do one of two things. You can house the rats in a brand new cage, or move them into one of the cages either rat has been living in. Moving the rats into a preexisting cage involves a lot of cleaning, rearranging, and time. Save this step for a day when you plan on being home so you can watch the rats. And if you do it in the morning when your rats are sleepy, it can ease the process.

For this step, I cleared off the bed and let the rats play while I cleaned. I had a towel, play tube, toys and treats on-hand to keep them occupied. I decided to house both rats in Patches' cage. I had to clean her smell out and make it seem new and unfamiliar.

You’ll need to clean the cage from top to bottom, throwing out all the old bedding and food. Use a pet cage cleaner from the store that both cleans and deodorizes the cage, and be as thorough as possible. After wiping down the cage and any other objects inside, rearrange everything. If you have a multilevel cage, move the shelves around. Change where the food and water are located, as well as any detachable ledges or other objects. If you have hammocks like my rats do, wash them and re-position them. The cage needs to look new to both the resident rat and the newcomer. It cannot smell like the resident rat, or they will defend it like it is their territory. It helps to disorient the resident rat by adding new toys and accessories to the cage that neither rat has seen. Once this is all done, you can let the rats explore.
Rats often play and scuffle by boxing, where they literally look like little boxers!

Rats often play and scuffle by boxing, where they literally look like little boxers! | Source

As with the play dates, expect more dominance scuffles started by either rat. If the process has gone well, the rats will eventually become good friends. The struggle for dominance will always be present, as one rat will always seek to be dominant. Wrestling and boxing are ways that rats like to play, so don’t worry unless you spot injuries or if a rat vocalizes pain. Remember: in the end it comes down to your gut. If you feel the rats aren't being friendly, then they may need more time apart. The truth is, most rats enjoy companionship and can become best friends over time.
August 1st, 2018
05:41 am
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How to Care for a Hairless Rat
https://www.wikihow.com/Care-for-a-Hairless-Rat

How to Care for a Hairless Rat

Three Parts:Feeding your Hairless RatTending to the Rat’s CageKeeping your Rat HealthyCommunity Q&A

Hairless rats have mostly bald, smooth skin, except for a few patches of hair, such as around the face or on the genitals. Hairless rats make playful, inquisitive pets, but they may require a bit of extra attention due to their lack of hair. You can provide your hairless rat with excellent care by learning about how to feed, house, and protect your rat's health.



1 Give your rat a lab block. Lab blocks provide all of the vitamins and nutrients that your rat needs to be healthy, so they should make up the majority of your rat’s calories (about 80%). Hairless rats may eat more than their furry counterparts because they require more energy to stay warm, so plan to check on your rat’s food supply often.

Keep in mind that male rats require less protein and pregnant and nursing female rats require more protein. For males, find a lab block that contains 16 to 18% protein. For pregnant or nursing females, look for a lab block that contains about 22% protein. Lab blocks made with soy are also beneficial for female rats.[1]




2 Offer some fresh fruit and vegetables to your rat. Rats like to munch on fresh fruits and vegetables as well, so try to offer your rat a piece of something fresh to munch on every day. Some good fruit and vegetable choices for your rat include:[2]

strawberries
watermelon
pears
apples
plums
kiwi
zucchini
spinach
broccoli
cauliflower
carrots



3 Let your rat have a special treat now and then. Other foods can provide great nutritious treats for your rat as well. Just make sure that these are given in moderation, such as once or twice per week. Some good occasional treats for your rat include:[3]

canned oysters
small pieces of meat such as beef, chicken, or shrimp
dog biscuits
yogurt
low-sugar cereal



4 Provide your rat with plenty of water. Rats need to stay hydrated and water is the best thing for them to drink. Make sure that your rat always has access to plenty of clean, fresh water in a sipper water bottle.

Do not give your rat a dish of water. Rats can kick feces and food into the water and contaminate it. It is also easy for your rat to kick his water over and this can lead to dehydration.[4]
Hairless rats also drink more water than regular rats, so you may need to check the water bottle more often.



5 Prevent your rat from eating certain foods. Rats can eat almost anything, but some foods may be harmful for your rat if he eats too much of it.[5] Try to prevent your rat from eating anything in excess and he should be fine. Some foods to avoid giving your rat include:[6]

green bananas
green potato skins
oranges
artichokes
onions
dry beans
raw sweet potatoes (cooked ones are okay)
rhubarb
raw peanuts (roasted ones are okay)
wild insects
blue cheese


Tending to the Rat’s Cage



1 Choose a proper cage for your rat. A wire cage, similar to a bird cage, is best. You can also house your rats in an aquarium or glass tank. As you choose a cage for your rate make sure that you consider:[7]

Size. Your rat will need to have room to run around and play in his cage. Make sure that you get a cage that is large enough for your rat to run around in. The general rule is 2 square feet per rat.
Floor. If you decide to go with a wire cage, then make sure that the bottom is solid metal rather than wire. Rats can get their feet caught in wire-bottom cages and this can lead to broken limbs and infections.
Play spaces. It is important to provide ladders and shelves within the cage so that your rat can climb around and play.
Wire Spacing. For adults, wire spacing should be equal or less than 1 inch. Remember, any hole a rat can get it's head through, it can get the rest of its body through. For babies, it's recommended to have a wire spacing of 1/2 inch or smaller.



2 Select softer bedding. Both hairless and regular rats require bedding material on the bottom of the cage to run, dig, and sleep. While wood chips such as aspen are fine for regular rats, the sharp edges can cut the skin of a hairless rat. Wood chips can also dry out the skin. Use paper bedding or recycled newspaper instead. You can also use a soft blanket made from fleece.[8]

Do not use cedar or pine shavings as they can cause respiratory problems in rats.



3 Change the bedding often. Hairless rats are more vulnerable to respiratory infections including mold. If you are cleaning bedding a couple of times per week for regular rats, then you need to change it three times or more for hairless rats.

To change the bedding in your rat’s cage, dump the soiled bedding into a garbage bag and dispose of it outside.
Spray the cage with water and scrub it with a pet brush and soap. Make sure that you rinse off the soap residue with warm water.
Then, dry the inside of the cage with towels and add fresh bedding.[9]



4 Adjust the ambient temperature. Hairless rats get chilled easier than regular rats. In addition to keeping the cage out of drafty areas, you should set the room’s temperature to the low-to-mid 70s Fahrenheit (low-to-mid 20s centigrade).[10]

A heat lamp, such as the type used in reptile enclosures, may also help to keep your hairless rat warm on chilly days.



5 Consider putting a hairless rat with a furry rat. Rats are highly social pets like many other small pets. As with most small pets, it is best to keep two pets of the same gender and similar age together. Hairless rats enjoy cuddling into the fur of the regular breed companion. However, you also need to put in additional boxes or pet “hammocks” for the rats to sleep in separately if they choose.[11]

Occasionally, the furry rat will scratch the hairless rat when in close proximity—though not necessarily due to fighting.

Keeping your Rat Healthy



1 Take your rat for regular veterinary checkups. Regular veterinary visits will help to keep your hairless rat in good health and catch any problems before they become severe. Take your rat to see a veterinarian soon after you get him or her. You should also watch for signs that your rat may be sick and take him to see a veterinarian if you notice anything unusual. Some signs of illness in rats include:[12]

lethargy
dull coat or puffy looking coat
loss of appetite
wheezing, raspy breathing, or other signs of respiratory distress
sneezing



2 Bathe your rat if necessary. Most rats do a good job of grooming themselves, so it is not necessary to bathe your rat often. However, you may decide to give your rat a bath if he develops a bad smell. At most, you should only need to bathe your rat once or twice per year.

To bathe your rat, fill the bathroom sink with warm water.
Then, use one hand to dunk the rat under the water to the head (not the head under the water).
Use your other hand and a toothbrush to lather a tiny bit of standard human shampoo on the rat’s skin. Avoid getting soap in the rat’s eyes or mouth.
Rinse off all of the soap.
Dry the rat with a towel, and move the rat to a clean cage to let him dry.
Consider using a heat lamp, or hair dryer over the drying cage to speed up the drying process.



3 Wipe your rat’s eyes. Your rat's eyes may need some attention now and then as well to keep them clean. To clean your rat's eyes, get a cosmetic sponge and run it under some warm water. Dab the sponge gently along both of your rat’s eyes and wipe away any debris that you notice.

Expect to see some little red flakes or “porphyrin.” In small amounts this is normal, but if you see excessive amounts then you should consult a veterinarian.[13]
Don’t use tissues or paper towels for eye cleaning as such products can leave pieces of cloth behind.



4 Massage the skin. Skin irritation is a major source of concern for hairless rats. One way to keep your rat’s skin in good condition is to give him or her an olive oil massage, which will not hurt your rat if he ingests it.[14]

To give your rat an olive oil massage, pour a small amount of olive oil into a small container and dip in your fingertips. Rub your oil coated fingertips on all areas of your rat’s skin except the eyes, mouth, and inner ears.
Repeat this massage once a week.
Follow up the massage with a high protein snack as a reward. Perhaps a piece of chicken, turkey, beef, or cube of cheese.

Community Q&A

Do hairless rats need sunscreen when taken outdoors?
wikiHow Contributor
Sunscreen would definitely be helpful if your rat is outside long enough. Keep in mind that rats constantly groom and lick themselves, so getting a non-toxic sunscreen that is safe to ingest is very important.
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Can a hairless rat use a blanket to stay warm in?
wikiHow Contributor
Yes. Just be sure to clean it and replace it regularly as they will usually chew it up and pee on it.
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I used to have a hairless rat, but he only lived for a couple of months after we adopted him. What did I do wrong?
Derspe
He may have been old when you got him, or may have had an underlying problem. As long as you fed and watered him, cleaned his cage and played with him, it probably wasn't your fault.
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How long does it live for? And what time do they go sleep?
wikiHow Contributor
All rats are nocturnal (sleep during the day) and they usually live for 2-3 years.
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Will the rat bite for no reason?
wikiHow Contributor
No. Rats only bite when they feel threatened in order to protect themselves, so try not to startle, corner, or force the rat into doing something they don't want to do, as that can lead to biting.
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I am allergic to rats; is hairless a better option?
wikiHow Contributor
If it's the hair dander that's causing the allergic reaction, this may be a good choice; however, it could be the saliva they bathe themselves with that you are allergic to. If you have the opportunity, find a hairless rat and see how you feel around it.
Not Helpful 0 Helpful 2
Will these tips work for hairless mice too?
wikiHow Contributor
No, I would not rely on these tips for hairless mice. I would do some independent research on that, and I would also read through wikiHow's article on taking care of mice.
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How do I care for a rat?
wikiHow Contributor
You can house it in a large plastic box and keep it in a cool, dry room. Get food from the pet store, and be sure to have a small bowl of water.
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I adopted a hairless rat last week and it randomly died this morning, what did I do wrong?
wikiHow Contributor
Maybe it died from natural causes.
Not Helpful 8 Helpful 1
Do you know what would happen if I bred a hairless rat with a normal rat? Is the hairless gene recessive or dominant?
DarkSpearOfJustice222
I think it's recessive. If that's the case, the baby could be hairless or normal, depending on which genes the other rat has.
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Can furry rats eat the same diet as hairless rats?
DreamingDancer
I don't see why they wouldn't, just because one has hair and the other doesn't. Generally all rats have roughly the same dietary needs.
July 31st, 2018
11:10 am
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More horrible scumbags running illegal cruel pet shops from home! >:-/
More horrible scumbags running illegal cruel pet shops from home! >:-/























July 27th, 2018
04:05 am
[moxxey]
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More Youtube scumbags who are cruel to small animals! >:-/
More Youtube scumbags who are cruel to small animals! >:-/ May karma come back to bite them by getting run over by their own farm tractors!























July 23rd, 2018
12:55 pm
[moxxey]
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Beware of this jerk who contacts rescues trying to get pet rodents for his snakes!
Beware of this jerk who contacts rescues trying to get pet rodents for his snakes!



July 16th, 2018
10:05 am
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This pet shop needs to be investigated, have all the animals confiscated and then be shut down!
This pet shop needs to be investigated, have all the animals confiscated and then be shut down! Why do we allow horrid businesses like this to operate? I mean this is not someone selling computer goods, I wouldn't care if someone was selling shoddy computer goods but for goodness sake these are living animals, well supposed to be but this awful pet shop has been letting them die in their care by not looking after them properly! D:

Please share and avoid this pet shop!

I wouldn’t normally use social media for something like this but as I have called the RSPCA and they seemed unable to help I think it’s only fair people are warned about it.

We visited “Diane’s pet shop” on Friday, we were shocked at what we saw!

In a small cage was approximately 20-25 rats, even more shocking was the range of ages in the cage. There were full grown adults, young rats and no more than 2 day old hairless pups!! Which were being kicked around the cage by older rats. As well as this there were dead ones at the back of the cage!!

The state of the other cages in the shop weren’t much better with the mouse cage being overcrowded too.

They had a note saying someone had already reported them for mistreatment of the mice but that the council don’t care about petty complaints and they had all had a good laugh about it!

I’m hoping this will stop this cruelty!

The photos I was able to get may be distressing to some.











July 6th, 2018
07:12 pm
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The B Family thought it was funny to play pranks with small animals but it's actually very cruel!
The B Family thought it was funny to play pranks with small animals but it's actually very cruel! Then after the family said they wanted to keep the small domestic rat as a pet, the one guy said he went and released it into the wild D: Domestic animals seldom survive in the wild and are not as aware of the dangers outside as their wild cousins are, plus they have fancy markings which make them stand out like a sore thumb when their wild cousins have camouflage colors to their environment! Please flag their video and report them to anti animal cruelty organizations such as the ASPCA, PETA or the Humane Society!

https://www.facebook.com/pg/The-B-Family-380241709128585/about/?ref=page_internal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W00RepvErX8&feature=youtu.be









12:09 pm
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Cruelty like this is inexcusable!
This is 100% cruel! This person is not only sick in the head but very sadistic to feed live mice to their bearded dragon! I hope something really bad and painful happens to them for doing this!!!















July 3rd, 2018
11:20 pm
[moxxey]
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Youtube's Reptile Channel continues to post more horrific animal cruelty videos in lieu of donations
The sick and twisted people who operate Reptile Channel on Youtube are at it again D: This channel is run by none other than the demented Jonah Vore who gets off at seeing small animals torn apart by larger animals like snakes and lizards. Banned from Youtube he operates it from behind the scenes while his girlfriend/wife and mother speak in the videos. They claim it is a "family friendly" and "educational" channel for reptile owners, but it's just really an outlet for them to garner donations from Youtube's Subscriptions and advertising. JNumerous people have reported the channel and it's gruesome vids of monitor lizards, pythons and even a giant anaconda where Jonah's mother lets it coil around her, stroking and petting it as if it were her pet D: They gift wraps live animals for their lazy reptiles and hand shoes full of baby rodents, squirrels caught in live traps, to letting their lizard have a rampage through a chicken pen for baby chicks, and they will go so far as to hand feed their snakes and lizards too. There is nothing educational about it! Even if some of their "newer" videos have been edited to look more "humane" you can be sure that they are not! These sick people take pride in drowning small animals, crushing them and then offering the freshly killed bodies to their reptiles, and in their other videos they show you the actual live kills.

You might ask well why don't animal authorities step in to put a stop to this? The problem is even though the channel states that they reside in the USA, it is not actually known where they live, but rumor has it that Jonah lives in Chihuahua, Mexico and the laws are hardly enforced there if there are any anti-cruelty protection laws at all. Still if enough people speak out against it, Youtube will finally be forced to ban them and then I hope that some animal lovers find them and well the rest I cannot comment, but you get the picture! >:-/







































































June 30th, 2018
09:52 pm
[moxxey]
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More sick slimeball creeps who think it's amusing to kill small animals! >:-/
More sick slimeball creeps who think it's amusing to kill small animals! These people need to be locked up in jail or worse! >:-/









































June 25th, 2018
03:14 pm
[moxxey]
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This sick bastard feeds live animals to his "pet" rattlesnake and spiders! >:-/
This sick son of a bitch from Sweet Water Alabama in Marengo County thinks it's cool to feed live rodents to his "pet" rattlesnake and spiders. He has a whole zoo of animalsin his house and yard! Animals like snakes, turtles, rodents, and other small mammals are kept in plastic containers, tiny tanks and tiny fish bowls. Not only is this animal hoarding at the extreme but he also sells pets from home through Facebook. People like this need to have all their pets confiscated and be locked up in jail for animal cruelty! He even recently posted a video where he fed a live rabbit to one of his large snakes and the rabbit could be seen still twitching! Not only that D: in his latest video he is shown to be even worse! He is a sick baby animal killer holding baby mice and rats up for his snakes to bite which is totally cruel and unnecessary!

What is even more disturbing is that Google and Youtube allow this guy to earn money from sponsors and ads to be able make cruelty videos for twisted entertainment and also to afford to keep so many animals. It is truly disgusting that Youtube would be more interested in keeping this guy's channel up because he brings in so many views by his live feeding videos instead of doing the right thing and banning him! >:-/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCux5vWplxhDL8FSAUX4bHoA/videos

https://www.facebook.com/edward.tyndall.54



Even his wife advocates being cruel to others by telling them to try feeding live animals to their pets D:

































































































June 19th, 2018
07:05 pm
[moxxey]
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There's some creep going by the name of @FunnyguyElmo sharing animal cruelty videos! >:-/
There's some creep going by the name of @FunnyguyElmo sharing animal cruelty videos! >:-/ People like this need their heads examined because they are very sick in the head. Also the person who made the original video needs a serious beatdown and then to have their ass hauled off to jail for what they did! >:-/

https://www.yooying.com/p/1804553648475580486_1997004845



This is what the mofo scumbag looks like!


Please report this mofo POS who thinks he's a comedian to the animal cruelty authorities! Help put his bitch ass in jail!!!
June 13th, 2018
12:44 am
[moxxey]
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More slimeball people running pet mills from their homes!
It'a scum like this cruel jerk of a guy who run pet mills out of their homes to make blood money off of the sale of animals that clog up the shelters and flood the pet industry with too many pets! Not only that but the pets are kept overcrowded in small confined conditions which are considered cruel! Things like this will sadly only lead to situations ilke this

http://fox6now.com/2018/06/04/all-hands-on-deck-at-humane-society-caring-for-400-snakes-mice-reptiles-removed-from-west-bend-home/











Circle of life he says? o.o If you want to talk about the circle of life scumbag, the only circle that needs completion is with your dead body being turned into compost for the garden you stupid POS!!!







As for the previously linked news story, I hope that they throw the book at him, and that this guy will follow in his footsteps to suffer the same fate even though I'd be happy if that waste of oxygen left the planet!

‘All hands on deck:’ Humane Society cares for 400 snakes, mice, reptiles removed from West Bend home

WEST BEND -- More than 400 animals pulled from the basement of a West Bend home on Friday, June 1 are being cared for at the Washington County Humane Society. Police said some of the seized animals were dead and others in poor condition.

Police arrested a 42-year-old man for sexual assault and false imprisonment. He could also face code violations after authorities removed 160 snakes, more than 250 mice, as well as several dart frogs and geckos from the home.

FOX6 News on Monday, June 4 got a look at some of the animals taken from the home at the Washington County Humane Society.

"Most of them are hognose. It can be a little overwhelming initially, but we get everybody situated -- get them all in their places," said Jessica Wermager, Washington County Humane Society.

The Humane Society on Friday was inundated with the surprise delivery after West Bend police confiscated the animals.

Jessica Wermager





"It's a little stressful to randomly get a call saying you care going to take in hundreds of animals. We do have all hands on deck with the staff," said Wermager.

Wermager said Humane Society officials have their work cut out for them taking care of all of these animals.

"One of the snakes had to be euthanized because it had tumors over the length of its body. Because of the condition of some of the equipment when it came in, specifically cages -- the racks the mice came in, there was some mold on the food they came in with, so we have to clean all that off and make sure that everything is proper for them," said Wermager.





The Washington Humane Society works with wildlife rehabilitators, but the animals are staying at the Humane Society for the time being.

Meanwhile, the man who was arrested at the home on Friday could face charges as soon as Tuesday, June 5 -- when he is expected in court. The sexual assault and false imprisonment case stemmed from East Troy, so he will appear in Walworth County.
Related stories

160 snakes, 250+ mice, small reptiles removed from home in West Bend





May 30th, 2018
07:54 am
[moxxey]
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Another Youtube creep who enjoys killing small wild animals >:-/
Here's another creep on Youtube who purposely blocks a wild rat with a shovel and sicks his pet ferret against it. Slimeballs like this deserve to die in a fire! >:-/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClWW0P37O0iYuvWlJa34R4w



May 27th, 2018
02:33 am
[moxxey]
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Someone should call the ASPCA on the Repticon vendors!
Someone went to Repticon and this is what they saw D: The jerk didn't even give the baby feeder rats enough water and had them all scrambling for the bottle. Also he had them cooped up in a plastic tub. No animal deserves this kind of inhumane treatment! >:-/ Laws need to be changed to protect small animals and ban live feeding!!!



May 25th, 2018
01:31 pm
[moxxey]
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This scumbag from the UK thinks it's funny to target shoot and sick his ferrets on small animals!
This huge waste of oxygen from the UK who is not only a slimeball but a mofo POS makes me sick with how he sicks his pet ferrets on wild rats, and he even thinks it's especially funny when they catch and kill baby rats! The scumbag also target shoots small animals D: I hope this bastard dies slowly and painfully in a fire or from some incurable disease! >:-/




May 20th, 2018
08:46 pm
[moxxey]
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Ship Rats and Pirats, two ratty books you might enjoy reading <:3O~
First there is Ship Rats, a book about rats voyaging upon the High Seas by author Rhian Waller, which can be obtained here : http://www.lulu.com/shop/rhian-waller/ship-rats-a-tale-of-heroism-on-the-high-seas/ebook/product-23649686.html

Ship Rats is an animal fantasy adventure set in the 1700s. It is part of a trilogy charting the voyages of Lu, Rip and Preen, three young rats who end up as accidental stowaways on a Dutch freighter. They face storms, hostile ship rats, drunken sailors and more; and this is only the start of their voyage around the world... Younger readers can enjoy this with their parents/guardians from ages 5-7, independent readers from 7-9. Part one of the Rat Tales Trilogy. This book supports APOPO which trains “HeroRATS” to save lives. Search APOPO for details.

Then there is Pirats a second ratty book by author Rhian Waller which can be purchased here : http://www.lulu.com/shop/rhian-waller/pirats-a-tale-of-mutiny-on-the-high-seas/paperback/product-23644201.html

Rip and her two sisters, Lu and Preen, survived storms and conflict on the voyage to Jamaica. But trouble is on the horizon when they meet a crew who are not what they seem... Stranded on a strange vessel, can Rip adapt to life on a pirate ship escaping the shadow of the slave trade, save the rats on board and find a way back to her family? To do so, she will have to become a Pirat! Sequel to the Wishing Shelf Award-winning Ship Rats. Profits go to the APOPO HeroRATs anti land-mine organisation.

May 4th, 2018
10:18 pm
[moxxey]
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Creep in Scarborough Ontario running an illegal pet shop from home >:-/
This twisted SOB think's it's okay to make blood money off of small animals by breeding and selling pocket pets as live food from his home! >:-/






April 4th, 2018
09:49 pm
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Happy World Rat Day! <:3O~
Happy World Rat Day!




www.worldratday.com/WhatIs.htm…

What Is World Rat Day? WORLD RAT DAY! APRIL 4, 2012! THE TENTH ANNUAL, INTERNATIONAL RAT HOLIDAY!

April 4, 2012 will mark the tenth celebration of World Rat Day, a holiday designed to recognize the fancy rat as a wonderful pet and companion animal for people of all ages. Sometime in 2002 on the ratlist, the longest standing mailing list on the internet dedicated to the topic of the pet rat, a discussion was sparked about the possibility of initiating a holiday to honor and promote pet rats as the wonderful companion animals they are. The date of April 4th was selected to be World Rat Day because this is the only certain date associated with the beginning of the ratlist (under the current ownership of James Kittock and Robyn Arthur). Any day of the year could have been selected but April 4th was settled on as a small tribute to the ratlist, a list that has truly been a great boon to all pet rats everywhere.

All true fans of the pet rat know that these dear, sweet animals deserve greater recognition and admiration, and that their image suffers from ignorance and unthinking prejudice. World Rat Day can be a day to win back some respect to rats through positive promotion, or at the very least, it will be a special day to offer delicious treats and fun gifts to our pets, making some rats very happy and getting some cute photographs in the process!

Many rat fanciers will choose to celebrate World Rat Day by planning private parties, with friends and family attending and possibly bearing gifts and treats to unsuspecting and surprised rats. World Rat Day greeting cards will surely make their way around the globe and in to the homes and hands of many grateful rats, although nobody can say whether they will be cherished or shredded. Many rat fanciers will probably plan larger events such as Ratfests, where many rat fanciers meet at a private home or special location to share food and rat-positive cheer. At least a few rat fanciers will seek out positive means to promote these special animals in various medias. World Rat Day lends itself well to organizing large-scale ratfests, contacting various medias for coverage in the "human interest" section of the newspaper, and even television programs. Whether World Rat Day is devoted to private parties or public outreach, we all will be prepared on World Rat Day to explain to anyone who asks that the pet rat is a wonderful pet with all the qualities necessary to become a part of the family. The pet rat is intelligent, devoted, clean, gentle, and imminently lovable. World Rat Day will prove all this to be true through the special efforts we make to honor our pet rats.

Join us in making the first World Rat Day a huge success by planning a private party, ratfest, public promotion or other event on April 4, 2012. If you would like to express your interest in helping to promote World Rat Day 2012, please contact Susan at susan@worldratday.com.

We have many special years of World Rat Day to look forward to, so there is plenty of time to work towards future events. World Rat Day in 2012 will be on a Wednesday. Tell everyone you know, and be sure to join the banner campaign to promote World Rat Day. If you are interested in adding a World Rat Day logo to your Web site, feel free to use any of the logos here.


If you would like more information about the ratlist, the oldest mailing list on the Internet dedicated to the pet rat, please visit the following link:
groups.yahoo.com/group/ratlist
April 2nd, 2018
08:50 pm
[moxxey]
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Words cannot describe this. Rats frozen alive in freezer - 3 survive D:
These evil people who did this need to be locked in a giant freezer until they're frozen solid! >:-/ Thank you to Mainley Rat Rescue for taking in the three girl rats who miraculously survived the ordeal of being frozen in a freezer.

March 9th, 2018
02:58 pm
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You do not threaten to abandon your pet outside if you cannot look after it anymore! >:-/
I don't care who you are, if you own a pet there is no excuse to not take it to a shelter or rescue if you cannot look after it anymore! What's even worse is the ad poster threatened to throw their two pet rats out in the cold if nobody took them. D: I simply cannot express what angry things I'd like to do to them for even saying that, let alone if they did that! >:-/

https://indianapolis.craigslist.org/pet/d/free-dwarf-rat/6490642665.html

February 14th, 2018
07:20 pm
[moxxey]
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People who sell animals as live food make me sick!
This rattery takes pride in making blood money off of small animals getting them pregnant over and over and then selling the babies as live food! They should not be allowed to own any animals and the SPCA should confiscate all their pets!





February 10th, 2018
08:06 pm
[moxxey]
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This is nothing but animal cruelty! I hope this monster dies in a fire!
I reported this video, but it's obviously a troll channel, but whoever did this feeding a live rat to a snapping turtle needs to burn in a fire!!! If you want to report the video, the info is in the screencap.

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